Making growing dome 2

A five-eighths, three-frequency icosahedron greenhouse for £30

A DIY dome greenhouse

A DIY dome greenhouse

Here is the completed dome, covered with polythene, bubblewrap, old tent, large dog-food bags and industrial clingfilm, mostly from recycled sources.

Growing inside the greenhouse dome

Growing inside the greenhouse dome

Currently it is growing melons, squash, cucumber and basil. On a sunny afternoon I have seen the temperature inside at 46 degrees plus.

Tools for the dome construction

Tools for the dome construction

Putting the pieces together

Putting the pieces together

I used a small brick, acrylic filler gun and stapler to fix the struts inside the connectors The first bit was easy but it soon

Pulling my hair out stage

Pulling my hair out stage

Starting to take shape

Starting to take shape

turned into a jumble of sticks that had me pulling my hair out. Once I started using supports stuck into the ground the dome stopped moving around and I began to see the shape

My knees got grass stains

My knees got grass stains

Oh I can see it now!

Oh I can see it now!

Crawling in and out of the triangles was certainly good exercise Finally the basic geodesic structure was complete

Then I had to move it!

Then I had to move it!

The covered dome nestles in tranquility

The covered dome nestles in tranquility

But then I had to move it to another part of the garden. The ‘roof’ needed additional support and I lashed more bits of bamboo to the structure at the top. I used all of the old polythene and bubblewrap I could find around the place, stapling it onto the struts. I also left a window in the roof to decrease humidity.

I put the greenhouse dome on top of some old slabs of concrete from a garage and these seem to work superbly as a heat sink. Since the structure sags slightly under its own weight, due to the flexibility in the hosepipe connectors, I wrapped it round the middle with several layers of industrial cling film for support, this seems to have done the trick.

It is certainly warmer in there than in our more traditional greenhouse. I realise this is a ‘bender’ of a greenhouse, but as this section of the garden is not overlooked it is perfectly acceptable. At dusk it sometimes looks as if a spaceship has landed in the garden. The plants need watering pretty much every day and I have never harvested so much basil in my life. I am very excited about my first melon.

My first home-grown melon

My first home-grown melon

Now it is a bit of a leap from a simple icosahedron to a 3 frequency, and in some ways I wish I had made this one as a 2 frequency dome – it did take a lot of time to make (and move) the structure. So for my next geodesic DIY greenhouse I want to make a 2 frequency dome with a more rigid framework.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Making growing dome 2

  1. Pingback: Strawberry Tower | Grown at Home

  2. Pingback: The Strawberry Tower | Nettle Soup

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *